Infertility and Pregnancy

Unexplained Infertility – All Too Common

Infertility is not your fault or that of your partner.

As I mention in my book, “Baby Maker” (Post Hill Press, 2018), issues with fertility are no more your fault than having poor vision.  Some people are genetically predisposed to certain health conditions.  I am pre-disposed to an autoimmune disease (multiple sclerosis).  You might be pre-disposed to high blood pressure, migraine headaches or infertility.  Not your fault.

So if you are feeling tremendous guilt or sadness over one or more failed attempts at pregnancy, isn’t it time to redirect your energy and emotions in a more positive direction?

You don’t have to search too hard to discover that fertility rates in the U.S. have fallen to a record low as of 2013 – 62.5 births per 1,000 women of childbearing age.[1]

Infertility affects 8-12 percent of couples worldwide.  Almost 11 percent of women in the U.S. between the ages of 15 and 44 have impaired fertility.[2]  And these statistics do not include women dealing with secondary infertility – an inability to conceive their second child, which affects an additional 3+ million women, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.[3]

In total, that is more than 7.5 million women who are having trouble getting pregnant.

By the way, approximately 40-50 percent are due to infertility issues with their male partner.

There are many factors contributing to the protracted decline in fertility rates we’re seeing in the U.S., including a drop in the number of women who are in their peak childbearing years, as well as an increase in the number of women who postpone having children.[4]  But there are other interesting correlations to our food industry and dietary trends in the U.S. over the last several decades, that I discuss in detail in my book, “Baby Maker”, that I won’t go into here.  Suffice it to say that science is pointing us in the direction of overall poor health, which is in many cases exacerbated by poor nutrition and lifestyle choices.  But—thanks to incredible break-throughs in science, we are learning that in some cases, we have the ability to change our genetic pre-dispositions and thereby improve our chances of sustaining good health.

The study of epigenetics and nutrigenomics are, respectively, the study of gene expression in the human body and how nutrition modifies gene expression.  Due to the advances in both of these vital areas of research, we are gaining insight into our ability to change how our genes express themselves by changing what we eat.  In other words, what you put in and on your body matters a great deal when it comes to maintaining good cellular communication, proper absorption in the GI tract, optimal filtration and detoxification processes, a healthy immune system, and the crown jewel for many of you – proper hormonal balance.


[1] Justin Caba, “Seminal Fluid, Not Just Sperm, Plays a Role in the Fetus’ Health, Including Obesity and Diabetes,” Medical Daily, January 28, 2014, accessed April 5, 2017, http://www.medicaldaily.com/seminal-fluid-not-just-sperm-plays-role-fetus-health-including-obesity-and-diabetes-268040.

[2] National Center for Health Statistics, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, updated February, 2015.

[3] National Center for Health Statistics…

[4] “U.S. Fertility Rates…”, M. Nathaniel Mead, “Nutrigenomics: The Genome-Food Interface, “Environmental Health Perspectives” 115, no. 12 (2007). Doi: 10.1289/ehp.115-a582.

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